Men’s Health

Multiple factors may contribute to care inequity"As much as racial and ethnic disparities exist broadly across health care in the United States, it is not surprising to observe this phenomenon in the urologic arena," writes Arthur L. Burnett, II, MD, MBA.
Streamlined management of Peyronie’s disease
Streamlined management of Peyronie’s diseaseIn this article, we describe our thought processes in treating patients with Peyronie's disease, which are summarized in an algorithm.
Progress on penile transplant moves forward"[Penile transplantation] is a real advance for patients who have a penile deficiency or penile loss," says Arthur L. Burnett, II, MD, MBA.
Penile transplant guidelines missing in actionThere are no national or international guidelines regarding penile transplants, raising a question without a concrete answer: What are the rules and the limits?
In-office andrology: Videos show office-based hydrocelectomy, vasectomy reversalThese videos depict key steps of office-based approaches to hydrocelectomy and vasectomy reversal.
Opioid abuse: How it is impacting men’s health"There are direct endocrine consequences of opioid use, including hypogonadism, that adversely impact men’s health," write Michael S. Leapman, MD, and Steven A. Kaplan, MD.
Study: Active surveillance uptake remains lowThe overall use of active surveillance in men with low-risk prostate cancer is 14.2%, according to an examination of the National Cancer Data Base.
Tissue-based PCa assays not robust to multifocalityTissue-based prognostic biomarker assays for prostate cancer are not robust to tumor multifocality and heterogeneity, according to research presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago.
Uro Pipeline: NDA submitted for non-metastatic castration-resistant PCa agentOther pipeline products discussed in this round-up include and advanced renal cell carcinoma agent, a bladder cancer detection agent, and a BPH treatment.
Shock waves may change future of ED therapyIt’s hard to argue against an erectile dysfunction treatment that is potentially disease modifying, is noninvasive, and seems to do no harm. The treatment, low-intensity shock wave therapy, has yet to earn the FDA’s approval but is widely used in other countries. Early results from ongoing U.S. trials are promising.