November 2017 Default Cover Image
MedPAC advocates for MIPS terminationIf members of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission have their way, the new Merit-based Incentive Payment System will be sent into oblivion, never to be heard of again.
Senate takes aim at pharmacy benefit managers’ role in rising drug costsA recently proposed bill “offers transparency measures that provide stakeholders further elucidation of how money moves through the pharmaceutical supply chain,” writes the AACU’s Brian Henderson.
How to get reimbursed for BPH water vapor ablation
Pair of genes may predict prostate cancer metastasisOverexpression of a specific pair of genes might provide early warning of prostate cancer patients’ likelihood of progressing to metastatic disease.
Why you need to better counsel PCa patients on sexual functionThere’s a troubling disconnect between low-risk prostate cancer patients’ desire to preserve sexual function and the treatment choices they and their doctors often make.
LUGPA advocacy targets self-referral laws, USPSTF reformIn his health policy briefing, Deepak A. Kapoor, MD, discusses LUGPA’s comments to CMS regarding MACRA and the 2018 Medicare physician fee schedule.
Urology-specific APMs to encompass PCa, BPH, OAB“The APMs being designed by LUGPA allow for participation by all urologists regardless of their practice setting or affiliation,” explains Alec Koo, MD.
How care process models can help your practice“Care process models… represent a way to decrease variation and waste, and thereby they lead to improved outcomes and significant cost reductions,” says Jay T. Bishoff, MD.
LUGPA puts resources behind key policy initiatives, future leadersThe association and its member groups are “leading the way” in developing urology-specific measures that can be used for MIPS quality reporting, says LUGPA President Neal D. Shore, MD.
Prevent burnout by restoring professional fulfillment“The answer is to remove the barriers and frustrations that are causing burnout so that physicians can focus on their role as care providers,” advises Paul DeChant, MD, MBA.
PCa active surveillance trends revealed in ‘real-world’ studyNearly three-fourths of men with very low-risk prostate cancer underwent active surveillance as a primary therapy, according to a study presented at the LUGPA annual meeting in Chicago.
SNS vs. botulinum: Caveats, considerations
Sacral neuromodulation, botulinum show equal efficacyIn patients with refractory urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), sacral neuromodulation (InterStim) and onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) produce similar reductions in mean daily UUI episodes, according to 24-month follow-up data on patients treated in a randomized trial.
How to choose between Roth, traditional accounts
How to reduce opioid use in post-op patientsIn this interview, urologist Francis J. McGovern, MD, discusses the scope of the problem of opioid abuse, outlines opioid-sparing strategies, and explains what the future holds in this area.
IC/BPS: One-fourth of patients have Hunner lesionsAbout one-fourth of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome have Hunner lesions in the bladder visible on cystoscopy.
Cisplatin nanoparticles appear efficacious for treating NMIBCThe use of intravesical cisplatin nanoparticles reduces cancer cell proliferation while limiting drug absorption beyond the bladder barrier, according to early findings.
Bladder Ca subtypes ID’d, may yield personalized therapiesResearchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have outlined five distinct expression subtypes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, each of which may be targetable by different treatments.
Immediate post-TURBT mitomycin instillation reduces recurrence riskMitomycin C instillation within 24 hours after transurethral resection of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer significantly reduces the risk of recurrence and delays the time to recurrence.
Repeat hydrodistention found safe in treating ICRepeated hydrodistention as therapy for interstitial cystitis has a low complication rate and does not decrease bladder capacity over time.
PSA screening: What do you tell primary care docs?We asked several urologists about whether they advocate for PSA screening to primary care physicians in their area.
Shock waves may change future of ED therapyIt’s hard to argue against an erectile dysfunction treatment that is potentially disease modifying, is noninvasive, and seems to do no harm. The treatment, low-intensity shock wave therapy, has yet to earn the FDA’s approval but is widely used in other countries. Early results from ongoing U.S. trials are promising.
If disaster strikes, is your practice prepared?A month after Hurricane Harvey’s aftermath, Houston-based urologist Steven Canfield, MD, says his practice is still having to reschedule operating room times to help out with the hurricane-induced OR shortage.
Are you taking steps to prevent data breaches?"Urologists need to be ever more vigilant to protect the private information under their custodianship," writes Robert A. Dowling, MD.
Survey: Urologists lack knowledge, training in transgender careWhile urologists are generally comfortable discussing patients’ sexual orientation, they report that both their knowledge of care of transgender patients and training in such care are lacking.
Cost variation among urologists: Can we trim the fat?"All the surgeons I know think that while they may not be the best in the world at what they do, they are clearly above average (think Lake Wobegon, but as adults). Hence, it can be a little disconcerting when data is produced that suggests that at least half of us have room for improvement," writes Henry Rosevear, MD.
Foot stimulation may offer home-based OAB treatmentNew research may pave the way for a form of nerve stimulation for refractory overactive bladder that is home based and less invasive than current neuromodulation approaches.
Genomic testing linked to higher surveillance uptakeIn men with clinically low-risk prostate cancer managed in community-based urology practices, utilization of active surveillance as initial management is higher among those who undergo genomic testing.