Andrew Bowser
Andrew Bowser is a medical writer based in Brooklyn, New York.
Melanoma mortality higher in African-Americans
Educating patients makes a difference
Ban on tanning for teens
'Simple, doable,' nbut each state must approve
Dermatologists can show patients how language shapes self-image
Maui, Hawaii - Are your patients depressed or simply miserable because of their skin problems? A simple, quick and practical communication technique may help lift that burden, according to Dr. Michael A. Greenberg, M.D.
'Secret' predates Mohs method
Perry Nichols and the escharotic cancer cure
'Sensitive skin' a dilemma for derms: How do you treat what you can't see?
Maui, Hawaii - While complaints of "sensitive skin" may be challenging to address, dermatologists can frequently help patients obtain relief, even if there are no overt clinical manifestations to treat, according to Patricia G. Engasser, M.D.
Clinical trials reveal Artefill offers enduring results in nasolabial folds
New York - When approved by the FDA for use in the United States, the wrinkle filler Artefill (Artes Medical) is likely to be favored for longer-lasting results in nasolabial folds, frown lines, and other indications, according to Gottfried H. Lemperle, M.D., Ph.D.
The smallpox debate
San Diego - Healthcare and public-health workers vaccinated against smallpox have had few of the adverse events historically associated with smallpox vaccine, though unexpected cardiac events have occurred and continue to be investigated, according to Raymond A. Strikas, M.D.
Few adverse events seen among health workers who get smallpox vaccine; cardiac events investigated
San Diego - Health care and public health workers vaccinated against smallpox have had few of the adverse events historically associated with smallpox vaccine, though unexpected cardiac events have occurred and continue to be investigated, according to Raymond A. Strikas, M.D.
Phase III under way
New York - Adjuvant therapy with a macrophage-activating growth factor appears to prolong survival in high-risk melanoma, Lynn E. Spitler, M.D., said.
A military success?
San Diego - Smallpox vaccine has been given safely and effectively to more than 500,000 military personnel with adverse event rates at or below levels seen in the 1960s, according to John D. Grabenstein, R.Ph., Ph.D.

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